ASK I don't bite (maybe a little)

ME  

If God had wanted me otherwise, he would have created me otherwise.

GIRL, 19. I LOVE MY BABE. MEXICO. LOVE. FRIENDS. PEACE. MUSIC. KIND. CUTE. JAZZ. ART.DANCE. DRAWING. BISEXUAL. And most of all Im here for everyone who needs me...

FYN forever
dejavu394:

thedaughterofflowers:

i cant get over this

now that is a princess fairy tale dress

dejavu394:

thedaughterofflowers:

i cant get over this

now that is a princess fairy tale dress

(Source: swansong-willows, via jack-me-off-jill)

1 day ago
99,480 notes
besachan:

lookninjas:

fl-orida:

kawaiisugah:

mattbellamymuseofspace:

duod:


Many classic horror icons and other disturbing creatures share common characteristics. Pale skin, dark, sunken eyes, elongated faces, sharp teeth, and the like. These images inspire horror and revulsion in many, and with good reason. The characteristics shared by these faces are imprinted in the human mind.
Many things frighten humans instinctively. The fear is natural, and does not need to be reinforced in order to terrify. The fears are species-wide, stemming from dark times in the past when lightning could mean the burning of your tree home, predators could be hiding in the dark, heights could make poor footing lethal, and a spider or snake bite could mean certain death.
The question you have to ask yourself is this:
What happened, deep in the hidden eras before history began, that could effect the entire human race so evenly as to give the entire species a deep, instinctual, and lasting fear of pale beings with dark, sunken eyes, razor sharp teeth, and elongated faces?

To be honest that last question frightened me more that the picture.


That question is what always catches me and makes me want to reblog this

Reblogging for the question as well

What happened, deep in the hidden eras before history began, that could effect the entire human race so evenly as to give the entire species a deep, instinctual, and lasting fear of pale beings with dark, sunken eyes, razor sharp teeth, and elongated faces?
…  well, death happened, probably.
Here’s the thing.  As civilization has progressed, we have divorced ourselves from the natural processes of decomposition, especially in regards to the bodies of other humans.  There are exceptions, always, but for the most part our dead are promptly whisked away to a mortician  to be arranged for burial.  If we see them at all after that, it’s with veins pumped full of embalming fluid, a full face of makeup, and whatever other tricks are necessary to make the deceased look as though they’re merely sleeping. 
Back in the day, however, this was not an option. 
The process of decomposition is different for every corpse, but there’s some things that nearly always apply.  First, the blood and other fluids begin to pool in low-lying areas.  If the corpse is arranged on their back — and you’d think that most humans, upon realizing that their friend or family member had completely ceased moving, would roll them onto their back to look at their face, to check their breathing and see if their eyes would open — this means the blood will drain away from the face and leave the skin markedly paler.  Once rigor mortis has passed, the jaw will slacken as muscles soften, elongating the face.  The gums and other soft tissues retract, leaving hair and nails longer in appearance (your nails don’t grow after death — your cuticles shrink), and the eyes will sink back into the head, leaving them sunken and dark in appearance. 
And there’s your monster, right there.  Pale, dark eyes, long face, sharp teeth.  Literally, the face of death. 

Thank you! I reblogged this over a year ago without the explanation and now I know! 

besachan:

lookninjas:

fl-orida:

kawaiisugah:

mattbellamymuseofspace:

duod:

Many classic horror icons and other disturbing creatures share common characteristics. Pale skin, dark, sunken eyes, elongated faces, sharp teeth, and the like. These images inspire horror and revulsion in many, and with good reason. The characteristics shared by these faces are imprinted in the human mind.

Many things frighten humans instinctively. The fear is natural, and does not need to be reinforced in order to terrify. The fears are species-wide, stemming from dark times in the past when lightning could mean the burning of your tree home, predators could be hiding in the dark, heights could make poor footing lethal, and a spider or snake bite could mean certain death.

The question you have to ask yourself is this:

What happened, deep in the hidden eras before history began, that could effect the entire human race so evenly as to give the entire species a deep, instinctual, and lasting fear of pale beings with dark, sunken eyes, razor sharp teeth, and elongated faces?

To be honest that last question frightened me more that the picture.

That question is what always catches me and makes me want to reblog this

Reblogging for the question as well

What happened, deep in the hidden eras before history began, that could effect the entire human race so evenly as to give the entire species a deep, instinctual, and lasting fear of pale beings with dark, sunken eyes, razor sharp teeth, and elongated faces?

…  well, death happened, probably.

Here’s the thing.  As civilization has progressed, we have divorced ourselves from the natural processes of decomposition, especially in regards to the bodies of other humans.  There are exceptions, always, but for the most part our dead are promptly whisked away to a mortician  to be arranged for burial.  If we see them at all after that, it’s with veins pumped full of embalming fluid, a full face of makeup, and whatever other tricks are necessary to make the deceased look as though they’re merely sleeping. 

Back in the day, however, this was not an option. 

The process of decomposition is different for every corpse, but there’s some things that nearly always apply.  First, the blood and other fluids begin to pool in low-lying areas.  If the corpse is arranged on their back — and you’d think that most humans, upon realizing that their friend or family member had completely ceased moving, would roll them onto their back to look at their face, to check their breathing and see if their eyes would open — this means the blood will drain away from the face and leave the skin markedly paler.  Once rigor mortis has passed, the jaw will slacken as muscles soften, elongating the face.  The gums and other soft tissues retract, leaving hair and nails longer in appearance (your nails don’t grow after death — your cuticles shrink), and the eyes will sink back into the head, leaving them sunken and dark in appearance. 

And there’s your monster, right there.  Pale, dark eyes, long face, sharp teeth.  Literally, the face of death. 

Thank you! I reblogged this over a year ago without the explanation and now I know! 

(via wingsofsupernatural)

1 day ago
263,217 notes